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View Full Version : Which shooting stance do you use?



skater4790
07-09-2011, 02:36 PM
At work they teach us to use an isosceles stance because your vest faces the threat and gives you the most protection but what happens when youíre off duty and not wearing a vest. Now your whole unprotected chest is facing the threat if you use an isosceles stance, do you now use a weaver stance?

Bill K
07-09-2011, 02:55 PM
My belief is neither stance will be used in most gun fights. From the USMC rules for gun fighting #4 says " If your shooting stance is good, you're probably not moving fast enough nor using cover correctly.". If you're shot at first you'll probably crouch in reaction. I guess it is possible to be trained and conditioned to stand and deliver but I suspect that's not going to happen at the ranges most shootouts are likely to take place. I doubt many gun fighting systems would advocate or stress either "range" stance. Just my opinion.

Bill K.

yqtszhj
07-09-2011, 02:57 PM
Weaver stance is more natural and I shoot well that way rapidly. It's just the way i shoot. I don't have a vest since I'm just a civilian so that doesn't apply to me.

TheTman
07-09-2011, 03:29 PM
For practice shooting I think it's called the Weaver stance or modified Weaver, My right toe is in line with the back of my left heel shoulder width apart. (I'm right handed). Body is turned slightly to the right, strong arm is straight with wrist inline with the pistol, support arm is bent and left hand cupped under my shooting hand.
I've had no training, so this is just the way things ended up, especially after buying my Kahrs, and finding out I'd been a limp wrister all these years and making necessary changes. In a gunfight I imagine all this is going out the window as I move and look for cover.

yqtszhj
07-09-2011, 03:33 PM
My belief is neither stance will be used in most gun fights. From the USMC rules for gun fighting #4 says " If your shooting stance is good, you're probably not moving fast enough nor using cover correctly.". If you're shot at first you'll probably crouch in reaction. I guess it is possible to be trained and conditioned to stand and deliver but I suspect that's not going to happen at the ranges most shootouts are likely to take place. I doubt many gun fighting systems would advocate or stress either "range" stance. Just my opinion.

Bill K.

Sounds right to me. I guess we should all practice shooting while moving, etc... as often as we get the chance.

Barth
07-09-2011, 04:26 PM
Iím not in LE but did take a combat handgun course.
Instructed to shoot standing, lying on the ground and in a seated position.
Both hands, left hand only and right hand only. Reloading with only one hand. Shooting at moving targets. Shooting after immediate strenuous exercise. I think you all get the drift.

Suthrncop66
07-09-2011, 05:02 PM
i use a weaver stance at the range for quals but for practice I always move and shoot...It is more of a weaver or modified weaverthan an Isosceles because I am bladed. Although it makes the armpit area susceptible, it reduces the overall target, protects the groin and lower abdomen and to a small extent your throat and eyes. I also tuck my lead arm (left) against my body somewhat shielding the armpit area...

yqtszhj
07-09-2011, 05:36 PM
protects the groin and lower abdomen ...

Now I'm all for protecting that area. That's got me thinking Kevlar undies now. :D

Motor51
07-05-2012, 07:11 PM
If no cover is available I square off and get small :)

OldLincoln
07-05-2012, 07:45 PM
I probably shouldn't take a position but after reviewing both stances I have to say they both suck in a gun fight. I practice the C.A.R. position which is very bladed and you use your left eye to shoot right handed because the gun is aligned with it. It is closer to a rifle stance than classic pistol.

I don't know the actual percentages, but I'd estimate your cross section is reduced by at least 50% over the Weaver. This is important when in a close action shoot out where neither is likely doing much with sights.

JFootin
07-05-2012, 07:48 PM
My preferred shooting stance is sitting down. ;)

http://www.glamzzle.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/daniel-craig-sitting-and-holding-a-gun.jpg

JERRY
08-22-2012, 07:16 PM
i think its called a comabt isosolice. elbows straight while gun is outstretched, knees slightly bent, lead foot about a half step infront of the other.

Planedude
08-22-2012, 07:46 PM
Push to the isosolice, get a good trigger press and repeat on your front sight cadiance as required...

Of course, none of the targets I practice on have yet to shoot back and prove my system full of folly.

I think one has to master the basics of marksmanship first. The Weaver and Iso "stance" are good to learn as it presents to the new student as a form of "combat" trainning. In learning the martial art of pistol defence, getting the frame of mind right is the most important thing.
A real gunfight will have it's own unique set of "stances", sprints and duck & covers. Try shooting from every position and each hand every couple of sessions. Right now I have been working on my "speed rock" as I had a stovepipe last time I tried it. I must have done something in error... Got to practice till it works everytime.

At least it's fun.:D

QuercusMax
08-24-2012, 08:36 AM
My preferred shooting stance is sitting down. ;)

http://www.glamzzle.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/daniel-craig-sitting-and-holding-a-gun.jpg

And with your finger on the trigger, I see. Can't see 'em in the picture, but are there steel-toed shoes to go with the bow tie? :)

1R26
10-28-2012, 06:58 PM
I personally don't like the isosceles stance. It's too easy to be pushed off balance and does not lend itself for quick movenment. I've always utilized a weaver or modified weaver. However several of the comments are on target regarding moving and shooting.