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Thread: From Glock to Kahr: How to get used to the Kahr?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    96

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    INTARGC. Ur dead right. just not an easy gun to master like the glocks or 1911's or the Smith M & P is even more precocked than the glocks even, damn near single action.

    Kahrs have a loooooong 3/8" trigger travel to the bang thing, totally smooth as u well know but it takes time to get used to it. U can stage it if you concentrating, but personally i don't train that way as in a defense situation ur not gonna stage that gun, so just get used tothe double action system and I don't think your still gonna shoot groups like u can ur glock but at 10 yards you will be able to keep um allin a pie plate. It is what it is a close up personal defense gun that will indeed save your life. Smoe kahr owners can shoot the eyes out of their kahrs to, so it can be done, ne just has to to work at it harder. I have always considered my self one who shoots alot but not really a shooter per say. I am not that good with my PM9 but I truly love to shoot that gun more than my G19 or for that matter my K9 even. I gues it is maybe the challenge to. but it is my 24/7 carry peace and I know this gun inside and out and I trust it totally. One should shoot alot the gun that he carrys.
    another reason why I like to practice my defense stuff with the big FBI "Q" silhouette target. no bullseyes, BG don't wear bullseyes, big silhoulette body typle bowling pin type target and I can keep um all inside that target, they might be spread all over hell but they are in there. One thing about it, if I shoot a BG with my PM9,he is going to have hole sin him from his nose to his toes.
    It is easy to get alittle frustrated in shooting a kahr, but to me it is much more easier to fall in love with these little pocket rockets...

  2. #12
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    Sep 2009
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    FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocko View Post
    another reason why I like to practice my defense stuff with the big FBI "Q" silhouette target. no bullseyes, BG don't wear bullseyes, big silhoulette body typle bowling pin type target and I can keep um all inside that target, they might be spread all over hell but they are in there. .
    I do 80% of my range practice with some sort of large silhouette or BG photo target for the same reason. If the target gives you the approximate size of the BG at various distances, then you will not be surprised when confronted suddenly by a bad situation at any distance. I like using a target that can be set to move in to me from 15 yards while I draw from my holster - my local range has one lane with that capability. For testing/breaking in my guns I like to use bullseye targets also so I can get an idea of the accuracy or if anything may be off (most likely me). Getting back to my G19 vs. PM45 for tactical training those Glock 15 round mags sure are nice. I like to make sure my tac pants have at least 6 magazines fully loaded so I can stay in the "fight"/ training exercise without needing to excuse myself to reload.

  3. #13

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    I carry my Glock 19 and my CW9 together almost daily. I have no worries over the different trigger systems. Yes, there is a noticeable difference, but I practice with them both a lot and often together during the same range trip. It just takes time and practice.

    With that being said; I'm looking into a Sig with the DAK trigger system to replace my 19. Those trigger systems are very similar in feel.

  4. #14
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    Feb 2010
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    No offense to your current instructor, but you should seek out another instructor who will help you concentrate more on the fundamentals of shooting.
    Sight alignment, trigger control and grip.
    With solid fundamentals you won't have any problem changing from one pistol to another.
    From some of your initial statements it doesn't sound to me like you are 100% solid on the fundamentals.
    Get sight alignment, trigger control and grip down solid, then work on "tactical shooting".

  5. #15
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    Feb 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by intargc View Post
    If there are multiple assailants, everyone gets a round and then you come back around and give everyone seconds...
    Good in theory, sucks in practice.
    Get yourself into a good "force on force" class and you'll find that "boarding house rules" just does not work in a dynamic situation.
    First, as soon as the gun comes out, most people start moving.
    By the time you shoot BG#1, BG#2 and BG#3 aren't just standing around waiting for their serving of lead, they are either running away or attacking.
    Then there's the fact that handgun rounds suck at killing people.
    You shoot BG#1 and start looking around for his accomplices (who jumped aside when you started shooting), while you're trying to draw a bead on BG#2 who's bum rushing you from the side, BG#1 decides he's not ready to die today from one bullet and punches you in the side of your head. BG#3 meanwhile ran off 5 yards and has drawn his gat and is ready to blast in your direction as soon as he assumes the proper gangsta grip.

    A better plan when facing multiples is shoot your way out of the situation.
    What that means is shoot whatever is between you and the exit as many times as possible, as quickly as possible, while moving towards that exit.

  6. #16
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    Feb 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by intargc View Post
    I can get 2-3" groupings with the Glock on a good day at about 5 yards. On a bad day it's more consistently 3" groupings.

    It's pretty consistently about 3-4" lower than where I intended to shoot

    At times like this, I don't even know where my shots went because I don't see them on the actual target at times.
    Breakdown in the fundamentals.
    At 5 yards slow fire you should have 4 out of 5 rounds touching with a Glock 19, basically one ragged hole about an inch in diameter.

    Looking for your shots on the target is another sign that you aren't solid on your fundamentals. Looking for your shots on the target is usually associated with a poor follow through. Poor follow through is often indicated by pulling your shots low (sound familiar?).

    Get thee to a instructor who will work on your fundamentals.

  7. #17
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    Sep 2009
    Location
    Colorado
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    4,193

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    Coming from revolvers and 1911s, Glocks have always felt like the bastard stepchild to me. Kahrs have always felt "normal".
    NRA Benefactor

  8. #18
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    Apr 2010
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    DFW TX
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    Well said ltxi...well said.
    Attitude: it takes 43 muscles to frown, 17 to smile...and 3 for proper trigger squeeze.

    The olive branch is considered a symbol of peace, and good will. Last time I checked, it's still a switch.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    29

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    Quote Originally Posted by JodyH View Post
    No offense to your current instructor, but you should seek out another instructor who will help you concentrate more on the fundamentals of shooting.
    Sight alignment, trigger control and grip.
    With solid fundamentals you won't have any problem changing from one pistol to another.
    From some of your initial statements it doesn't sound to me like you are 100% solid on the fundamentals.
    Get sight alignment, trigger control and grip down solid, then work on "tactical shooting".
    When I'm taking advanced classes, it's not a time for fundamentals. If I need to take a fundamental class, I will take one. It's no fault of my instructor.

    Besides, I shoot fine with the glock. I can get right on target with the glock and keep up just fine in the tactical and advanced classes... It's when I use tha kahr that I start screwing up. I'm just not used to the trigger...

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by JodyH View Post
    Good in theory, sucks in practice.
    Get yourself into a good "force on force" class and you'll find that "boarding house rules" just does not work in a dynamic situation.
    First, as soon as the gun comes out, most people start moving.
    By the time you shoot BG#1, BG#2 and BG#3 aren't just standing around waiting for their serving of lead, they are either running away or attacking.
    Then there's the fact that handgun rounds suck at killing people.
    You shoot BG#1 and start looking around for his accomplices (who jumped aside when you started shooting), while you're trying to draw a bead on BG#2 who's bum rushing you from the side, BG#1 decides he's not ready to die today from one bullet and punches you in the side of your head. BG#3 meanwhile ran off 5 yards and has drawn his gat and is ready to blast in your direction as soon as he assumes the proper gangsta grip.

    A better plan when facing multiples is shoot your way out of the situation.
    What that means is shoot whatever is between you and the exit as many times as possible, as quickly as possible, while moving towards that exit.
    Possibly... But he did give us a few police case examples of where a guy was being attacked by multiple assaliants with guns and in those cases the person was shot by the second or third assaliant by the time he got to them.

    It's debatable, of course. But I like how my instructor has been in many hand-to-hand and gun fight situations and can pull from his own experience as well as his investigative experience as a police officer...

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