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Thread: Obsessive Compulsive reloading

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    Default Obsessive Compulsive reloading

    Being that I also shoot long range I tend to get carried away with methodical steps such as case neck thickness, primer hole uniformity, case length ,weight, exct. Also reloading is a hobby for me I do not consider it a chore or a laborus task.

    For a question who else for the first reload of once fired cases trims all to the same length for the first reload I do not generally do this after the first firing. Also I ream lightly and uniform all the primer pocket holes once in their life generally first reload. Pmc brass while I like it has very rough primer holes with jagged materials and irregular sizes in alot of it's 45 acp brass. Also i chamfer all case mouths every time I reload plus a list of other things I tend to do.

    I know you do not have to get this crazy and not saying it is right or wrong I was just wondering who else takes the case prep to the extreme.

    I will say in my 1911's I shoot bullseye with I definetly see a diffrence in reloads that are case prep was taken to the extreme,using brass of same weight and make . I do not do this for USPSA.

  2. #2
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    Default

    I find that best accuracy with semi-autos, that head space on the case mouth, comes from the longest cases. Thus, for 9x19, I set aside the few longer cases just for match loads. .45 Auto doesn't seem to care much what you do, it still shoots accurately.
    I can not see EVER getting better accuracy by increasing the "head space" by trimming cases. The extractor simply can't hold the round concentric to the bore. If you pushed the shoulder of your bottleneck cases back a consistent 0.010", would that improve accuracy (after all, consistency is the secret to accuracy, so as long as everything is consistent...)
    I also never found any improvement by trimming revolver rounds, that head space on the case rim. The idea of a "consistent" roll crimp improving accuracy seems to have eluded my revolvers.
    I also find that mixed head stamp cases shoot as well as separating head stamps (but my best rifle is only capable of 0.75 MOA).
    I don't know where the "younger generation" has become so enamored of trimming and cleaning cases.
    However, as long as you are safe, do whatever makes you feel better.
    Last edited by noylj; 03-10-2017 at 12:58 PM.

  3. #3
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    Default

    For me, all the brass processing related to rifle/bolt action/long range guns is a waste of time when applied to average slab sided/brass chucking scrap-o-matic handgun.
    Especially shelf defense/combat type handguns, more designed for reliable function than accuracy.

    I have found you can "develop" a load using tweaked processed brass for this type of gun, and change to mixed/once fired brass and see no difference.
    I load for group size to a point, but mostly concentrate on point of aim/point of impact for fixed sighted guns.

    Now wheel guns or target semi-autos are a different animal.
    Caution-re-loading can become addictive and anal for some.

    I apologize if my post contains the same or similar information as someone who has posted before me.

    My ignore list contains many members who I consider scenters and/or agitators and I do not see/read what they post.

  4. #4
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    Default

    All this talk makes my head hurt worse than my daily job. Thats why I buy and shoot by the case.

    That being said I am in future trouble though because every piece of brass that I shoot I try to find and save (and only my brass.) I have four 5 gallon buckets each filled with 9mm, .45 acp, .223/5.56, and .308. I expect to see exactly what you all are talking about in my future as soon as I have time because I've already investigated what I need to get started.
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  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by yqtszhj View Post
    All this talk makes my head hurt worse than my daily job. Thats why I buy and shoot by the case.

    That being said I am in future trouble though because every piece of brass that I shoot I try to find and save (and only my brass.) I have four 5 gallon buckets each filled with 9mm, .45 acp, .223/5.56, and .308. I expect to see exactly what you all are talking about in my future as soon as I have time because I've already investigated what I need to get started.

    OK then
    What do you do when your normal purchased ammo hits 4 inches high from point of aim, shooting a gun with fixed sights

    I prolly posted this before but my "buddy" is always calling me a cheap bastage because I reload, yet he buys the cheapest crap he can find, usually steel cased.
    Out shooting one time and he was whining about his gun fixed sighted gun always hits 6 inches high.
    I know it's the crap ammo but only said, "gee, maybe you should try reloading"...
    I could almost see the lightbulb over his head go on
    I got that blank stare from him, before I said, "sorry I don't let anyone shoot my reloads".
    Last edited by Tilos; 01-30-2017 at 11:05 PM.
    I apologize if my post contains the same or similar information as someone who has posted before me.

    My ignore list contains many members who I consider scenters and/or agitators and I do not see/read what they post.

  6. #6
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    Sep 2010
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    5,415

    Default

    True. I have bought garbage ammo (steel case, etc... ) a couple of times and regreted it each time. Learned my lesson quick. Now I only buy brands I have bought in the past and had good luck with when on sale, and in bulk. It does make the wife ask how much is enough though.

    To my surprise I've had the best consistency with PMC and S&B and if I'm patient I get a good deal from my favorite online ammo dealer when they have a sale. American Eagle .223 has been good. The last batch of American Eagle 9mm I picked up was the most smokey dirty stuff I have shot in a while. Won't buy any more of that. Picked up a bunch of 168 gr .308 SMK loads a couple of years ago for $12.95 a box shipped. And it shoots 1/2 moa at 100 yards but I haven't seen it that cheap again but I still have some. .308 will probably be one of the first I reload when I start, and probably .45 too.

    Up until the last year I've worked so much I didn't have time to reload but that's changing some. Almost have all the brass I need too so it will be a good time to start. Figure if I retire I'll have the time and less money to buy it so it will work out.
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  7. #7
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    Mar 2012
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    Default

    The main thing is why do unproven tricks (in the name of consistency) that are used for 0.3MOA rifles for long-distance shooting with a handgun that uses a different type of case (straightwall vs. bottleneck) and can, at best, do 12 MOA?
    Until the late '80s, magazine were full of authors who actually TESTED things and reported their results. Today, all they do is parrot whatever the advertiser says. Don't think I have really seen any TESTING of ideas, even in Handloader, in a couple of decades.

  8. #8
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    Default

    With 45 and 9 the only extra work we do is sort not only calibers but also manufactures. It seems to make things little more consistent.
    Plus I tumble, punch primer, and then sonic clean.

  9. #9
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    Location
    SW USA
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    Default

    >With 45 and 9 the only extra work we do is sort not only calibers but also manufactures. It seems to make things little more consistent

    As I said, "
    Don't think I have really seen any TESTING of ideas, even in Handloader, in a couple of decades."
    The following is my own results with .45 Auto (various bullets and powder charges). I would take my loaded rounds and post-loading sort them for head stamp, such that there was no loading bias. This meant that the number of mixed case groups almost always exceeded the matching case groups. So, the avg. and S.D. was less with mixed head stamp cartridges, meaning that sorting for .45 Auto is NOT a worthwhile activity.

    .45 Auto:
    Loads made at same time and then sorted by head stamp
    Groups at 25 yards
    matching mixed
    1.94 1.29
    1.69
    2.81
    2.97 2.09
    2.44
    1.38 1.81
    2.25 2.41
    2.00 1.59
    2.22 2.88
    2.72 2.00
    3.91 2.22
    1.44 1.88
    3.38 2.50
    1.38 1.75
    2.44 2.69
    3.13 2.13
    3.38 2.31
    2.44
    3.13
    1.50 2.31
    2.44 2.44
    2.81 2.44
    1.88 1.75
    2.56 1.97
    2.69 2.13
    2.31 1.16
    2.06
    2.19
    2.75
    1.75 1.59
    2.25 1.69
    1.94 2.19
    2.78 4.81
    1.84 1.38
    1.66
    3.88 2.03
    3.44 2.69
    3.50 2.69
    2.56 3.22
    2.00 1.38
    2.56 1.69
    2.75 1.56
    1.50 1.44
    3.00 1.53
    1.35
    1.40
    1.60
    1.65
    1.70
    2.44 2.50
    2.38 1.22
    2.47 2.06
    2.75 2.13
    3.31 2.63
    2.19 2.03
    2.25 2.88
    2.48 2.11 Avg
    0.66 0.63 S.D.

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