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Thread: My Negligent Discharge

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Northwest of Los Angeles
    Posts
    68

    Default My Negligent Discharge

    It finally happened. I'm 74, have been shooting since I joined the Marine Corps at 18, and just the other day I had my first and only negligent discharge.

    I own and regularly train with three different Kahrs: a PM9, an MK9 and a K9. They all have similar triggers, with a very smooth, long, revolver-like pull. Recently, I added a Sig P220 Equinox Carry to the mix. That pistol is hammer fired, DA/SA, meaning the first pull of the trigger is quite long and maybe 9 pounds, while subsequent pulls are extremely short and maybe 2.5 pounds. Light, in other words.

    The other day I went to the local indoor range and took along the K9 and the Sig. I fired about 100 rounds through the Kahr, then switched over to the Sig. I fired a round out of the Sig, then paused to look at something and let my gun hand fall to the table. Just as I began to raise the Sig to the firing position, it suddenly discharged. It was pointed approximately downrange and the bullet went into the floor. No damage or injuries, by the grace of God.

    What happened? After a great deal of thought, here is what I believe occurred. I had been used to the Kahr trigger, which has a long pull. I believe that I had gotten into the habit of beginning to stroke the Kahr trigger before the pistol was at eye level and the target was in the sights. As the pull was long, the action, though wrong, had no consequences. However, when I subconsciously did the same thing to the Sig trigger while it was in SA mode, it was enough to cause it to fire.

    Shocked and shamed at the same time, but some lessons re-learned:

    -- An ND can happen to anyone, no matter how experienced. Even me. Even you.
    -- Finger off the trigger until target is in the sights and ready to fire.
    -- Be VERY careful when operating two weapons with completely different manuals of arms.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    5,500

    Default

    ^^^ Amen. Glad you all are OK.
    ​O|||||||O

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Wet & Wild Pacific NW
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    26,754

    Default

    Even Jeff Cooper had a negligent discharge. Hold your head up. Nobody hurt, nothing damaged.

    Call it a wake up call. Apparently that's why there's more than one safety rule. You had it not pointed at anything important so turned out ok.

    All common sense really so your ok.

    Carry on. Don't throw the Sig away, weren't it's fault.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    103

    Default

    All that matters is you and everyone was unharmed. I have only had one instance of a negligent discharge. Bersa 380 I bought used..first time shooting, loaded raised and racked slide and not use to the trigger guard, finger slipped on the trigger and it had been modified to be a hair trigger. Fired two shots in a row in the air above the target. Lucky it was at my sons 6 acre property and not the range. Replaced about every part in the gun!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    5,467

    Default

    Had one on a 1911 one time. It was pointed down range and I was somewhat aiming but the gun went off before I expected. Sounds kinda like your situation. After the next teardown I found the sear is worn pretty good which contributed to the lightness of the trigger. I need to replace it. Havent shot that gun since that I recall. Like you said, finger off the trigger.
    The only thing better than having all the guns and ammo you'd ever need would be being able to shoot it all off the back porch.

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,925

    Default

    I'm glad that you didn't call it an accident.......................................... I own striker fired, and sa/da firearms with hammers. I shoot them all on a regular basis. I have never had a negligent discharge, and don't believe I ever will because I do shoot different style firearms, and am used to handling both. I guess the lesson still learned is keep the bugger picker off of the bullet flinger. Glad no one was injured. I hope that you didn't have to change your pants

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Twin Cities MN.
    Posts
    3,259

    Default

    Is that the same as a premature discharge.....
    "Life Member NRA"
    45's Rule...all others are wimpy!....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Northwest of Los Angeles
    Posts
    68

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jeepster09 View Post
    Is that the same as a premature discharge.....
    Pretty much....and equally embarrassing 😱

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Thanks for sharing, we all need to be reminded that it can happen anywhere, at any time, to anybody.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    The Free Zone
    Posts
    5,103

    Default Accidents Happen

    - Finger off the trigger until the target is in your sights, identified and you are ready to fire.
    - Always point the firearm in a safe direction.


    Yes, anyone can have an accidental discharge.
    As you have discovered, just a momentary lapse in concentration can end in disaster.
    Glad no one was injured.

    IMHO it's really important to never get too relaxed and easy when handling loaded guns.
    Lesson Learned

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