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Thread: PM9 light primer strikes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    11

    Default PM9 light primer strikes

    I just recently picked up a used PM9, old style which was produced in 2008. It has been shot and looked to be in very good condition. While I need to put a few more boxes thru it to verify any issues, I did have to light primer strikes in the first 50 I shot.

    Question is, should I consider a new striker and spring. As mentioned I will be putting a few hundred more down range and even if there are no more issues, would the change be worthwhile or needed.

    BTW - when I picked up the gun and checked it out, the previous owner had the outer recoil spring installed backwards and a few coils were actually off the back of the retaining lip and were touching the rear inner spring. Will be replacing that as well

    Sent from my SM-T377V using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Upstate, South Carolina
    Posts
    815

    Default

    I would do a full break down of the slide, clean the striker channel well, inspect the striker, look for any dings, or scratches, smooth out anything you see. Re-assemble (I oil the striker, then wipe it dry) oil free. See what happens. Any time I buy an unknown used I gun, I replace most if not all of the springs, so I know the mileage.

    -Ken
    NRA Benefactor

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kenemoore View Post
    I would do a full break down of the slide, clean the striker channel well, inspect the striker, look for any dings, or scratches, smooth out anything you see. Re-assemble (I oil the striker, then wipe it dry) oil free. See what happens. Any time I buy an unknown used I gun, I replace most if not all of the springs, so I know the mileage.

    -Ken
    Thanks for the suggestion and sounds like a good plan. If I take it down and remove the striker I will probably replace it as well.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
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    11

    Default

    Before taking kenemoore's advice I decided to take it to the range one more time. Had another 6 light primer strikes in one box, 50 rounds using different ammo.

    Once home, I completely tore down the slide and was amazed at the amount of oil and or lube coating the striker, the spring and basically everything. It looks like the previous owner emptied a bottle of lube in it. Did a complete cleaning and now just waiting for the new striker, spring and rod to arrive. Also have a new recoil assembly coming as well.

    Sent from my SM-T377V using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    601

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sig_Man View Post
    Before taking kenemoore's advice I decided to take it to the range one more time. Had another 6 light primer strikes in one box, 50 rounds using different ammo.

    Once home, I completely tore down the slide and was amazed at the amount of oil and or lube coating the striker, the spring and basically everything. It looks like the previous owner emptied a bottle of lube in it. Did a complete cleaning and now just waiting for the new striker, spring and rod to arrive. Also have a new recoil assembly coming as well.

    Sent from my SM-T377V using Tapatalk
    Betcha it'd be fine if you just re-assembled it and kept the striker channel clean and dry,.

    There's an easy way to keep it clean and dry. Notice the little hole in front of the bottom #9 arrow in the Kahr lube diagram. Glocks have this too.

    Just stick the extension tube of a can of Birchwood Casey Synthetic Safe Gunscrubber, or CRC Non-chlorinated brake cleaner (green can) in this hole and blast away for a few seconds.

    I move the striker back and forth as I do this while holding in the striker block.

    Never hurts to detail strip the slide, but this alternative only takes seconds to do...


    KahrLubePoints.jpg

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ed M View Post
    Betcha it'd be fine if you just re-assembled it and kept the striker channel clean and dry,.

    There's an easy way to keep it clean and dry. Notice the little hole in front of the bottom #9 arrow in the Kahr lube diagram. Glocks have this too.

    Just stick the extension tube of a can of Birchwood Casey Synthetic Safe Gunscrubber, or CRC Non-chlorinated brake cleaner (green can) in this hole and blast away for a few seconds.

    I move the striker back and forth as I do this while holding in the striker block.

    Never hurts to detail strip the slide, but this alternative only takes seconds to do...


    KahrLubePoints.jpg
    Yup, it may be fine as is, and I thought about putting them back in, but the new parts are coming so I might as well wait.

    I normally use gunscrubber on all my used pick ups when I first get them. This one I didn't yet as I originally had my doubts about the recoil spring and I just field stripped and went to the range.

    Thank Ed



    Sent from my SM-T377V using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    174

    Default

    I had that happen on my P380 and when I removed the striker, it was CAKED with goop.....a good cleaning in there and it's been fine since. I detail strip the slide about 2x per year now. I'd bet yours will be fine now.

    Charlie

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    115

    Default

    Always keep your striker channel clean by detail stripping the slide at every few hundred rounds. Use spray degreaser/cleaner to flush off the gunk inside. It is also good idea to replace the striker spring occasionally - at every few thousand rounds or when the RSA is replaced.

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