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Thread: Newbie with new CT380 gold slide

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    135

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    Check the extractor tension, mine was way too much. After I reduced it, it has been 100% with all the ammo I put threw it. My CT380 is one of my favorite pistols I own. I bought some of that Ventura (Ruger) ARX that I haven't had a chance to try yet, but I can't help to think it will be OK. The bullet profile looks pretty similar to 380 ball ammo.


  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    6000' in AZ
    Posts
    20

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    Does the extractor tension come into play when just loading the first round? It looked like the last few rounds seemed to be feeding more easily. Being out of sync with the group, I got as far as loading the first round a few times, but wasn't able to shoot, and went from loading that round, to unloading the gun.

    I found it interesting that the owner of the range, who was helping out all of us newbies, said a couple of times that "that gun is going to get you killed". I let it roll off me like water off a duck.

    I didn't try the 'tap the back end of the slide" because the owner of the range cleared it the first few times by emptying the gun, so I continued the practice to clear the jam. But I'll certainly try that next time out. AZ CCW class is now on a back burner until I get this baby broken in.

    Cynthia

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    135

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    Absolutely, it comes into play each and every time a round is loaded and unloaded.


    FAILURE TO FEED
    In most instances, an extractor that is adjusted too tightly (too much extractor tension) will cause a failure to feed. In this condition, the case head is not allowed to travel up, into the breech face because the rim of the cartridge never becomes fully-seated under the extractor hook.

    Excessive extractor tension can also cause the extractor to dig into the cartridge rim, which is made of brass. This will cause inconsistent feeding or an intermittent feeding problem.

    Refer to View A. This illustration shows the end of the extractor as if you were looking at the breech face from the muzzle end but it shows the extractor hook only. You will see on the left what the majority of extractor hooks are machined like. We want to radius the lower portion of the hook as shown in the illustration on the right. This area, when left with a sharp transition, can dig into brass and impede feeding.

    The second problem area, View B is a view of the extractor from the same vantage point with the hook removed. You will see a small bevel where the case slides up the extractor face that usually has a sharp intersection. I take a small needle file and radius this intersection to smooth up the transition point.

    When examining your brass you will find small dings on the rim of your brass, this is the area of the extractor that causes it. Similarly with the hook not being radiused you will find small dings in the web of your brass.

    FAILURE TO EXTRACT
    Failures to extract are usually related to an extractor with too little tension. With too little tension, the brass is not held securely long enough in the cycle to be properly ejected. The brass is allowed to loosely float around as the pistol cycles. The brass hits the ejector in a non-uniform manner and ejection is very random. One case may be tossed several feet, another case may just barely clear the edge of the ejection port.

    https://www.brownells.com/aspx/learn...aspx?lid=10261


    Does the extractor tension come into play when just loading the first round?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    135

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    In all the Kahrs that I have seen with the tight extractors, a tap on the slide would make it go into battery. I'm not trying to be condescending, because I don't know your level of skill, but be sure to keep your finger off the trigger and keep the pistol pointed down range when you do it.

    I didn't try the 'tap the back end of the slide" because the owner of the range cleared it the first few times by emptying the gun, so I continued the practice to clear the jam. But I'll certainly try that next time out. AZ CCW class is now on a back burner until I get this baby broken in.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    6000' in AZ
    Posts
    20

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    I don't mind good hearted reminders. I'll be cleaning and lubing the CT380 tonight based on the stickies here, and not on the cleaning class I took that seem to have missed a few things. He was using a multi function spray, so only the rails got oiled independently from the multi cleaner. Striker channel did not get cleaned.

    Cynthia

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Wet & Wild Pacific NW
    Posts
    27,929

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    Don't worry too much about that striker channel. It's fine to clean it once in awhile but not generally a big issue after each shooting session.

    It should be left dry. If your talking about squirting some brake cleaner in there to flush it out, that's fine. I don't even do that every time, in fact I seldom do.

    Don't lose any sleep over instructor comments neither. They have a natural tendency to put down things they don't understand.
    I think it would be best to get a bunch of rounds shot and get the gun running well before any class's.
    http://bawanna45.wix.com/bawannas-grip-emporium#!
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    Dietrich: For a fat girl you sure don't sweat much.
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    RIP Muggsy & TMan

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    6000' in AZ
    Posts
    20

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    Well, I thought, since I had a spray can of what I thought was a gun cleaner, I'd go ahead and clean the striker channel. To my surprise, the spray can, G96 Gun Treatment, spewed out foam all over my slide. I had used Outers Tri-care before, which seemed like 95% cleaner and 5% oil, and I was expecting something similar. The Gun Treatment on the other hand was totally greasy, maybe 95% oil and 5% cleaner. Talk about not oiling the striker channel, I probably flooded it with oil. I found I had some CRC Electronic Contact Cleaner on hand, so flushed the channel well with that. Gun Scrubber on order at Amazon.

    Not happy at all with the local indoor shooting range. In the small print under their range fees, it says the fees are based on one hour use and when busy may be by the half hour.

    The indoor range the next city over has no time limit, talks about a 'point and shoot' class, and has a ladies day at half off. I'm really beginning to warm toward this range. So I guess I'll get the other 160 rounds of the break-in fired this coming Thursday (Ladies Day), or at least get a good start on it.

    Cynthia

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    591

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    Cynthia - Walmart.......$3 per can. Make sure it is the non-chlorinated, 50 state formula. Works great - just like gun scrubber.

    The CRC Brake cleaner in the red can is a no no for plastic parts. Regular Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber is also a no no. Gotta be the synthetic safe formula - yes there is two different formulas.


    CRC.jpg

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    6000' in AZ
    Posts
    20

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    I ordered this one, https://smile.amazon.com/Birchwood-C...s=gun+scrubber . Says it's synthetic safe, but I will still protect the paint on the sights, and the ArachniGrip on the slide while using it. Will probably also pick up a green can of Brakleen next time I'm in Walmart.

    Cynthia

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    6000' in AZ
    Posts
    20

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    Back from the range. I have my 200 rounds in now. I started shooting today with a full box of Blazer Brass and the first 2 8rnd mags were flawless. Quite shocking after the previous experience. Out of a box of 50, I only had one failure to feed, and hitting the back of the slide fixed it. The remainder of the box of American Eagle, about 2/3rds full, had only one similar failure to feed. The remaining 2/3rds of the Remington UMC box had 8 failures to feed, but the remainder of the Armscor 2/3rds box, the cheapest ammo I bought, was terrible, maybe 40% failure to feed, and some of those were bad enough you could not hit the back of the slide to make the shell seat, but had to eject the shell. Also 1 misfire in the Armscor lot. So, I'll stick with Blazer Brass and American Eagle for target practice.

    I'll be looking for the ARX ammo at the show Saturday.

    I noticed that the force to pull the trigger was not always the same, sometimes much easier.

    So, what is:

    1) FTF? (Failure To Feed?) Is this what I had when I could hit the back of the slide and seat the shell?
    2) FTRB? (Failure To Return to Battery?) And how does this differ from FTF
    3) Stove pipe? Is this where the shell is so badly positioned that you have to eject the shell.

    Cynthia

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