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Thread: Reloaders?

  1. #11
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    The best way to get into this reloading thing is to find somebody who reloads that you trust and watch or help reload a few. This helps you decide if you want a single stage or progressive press and gives you a solid idea of the equipment that is a must have or the equipment that is nice and you can get later.

    Just like most everything else there are tons of options out there and unlike most other things most of the options are very good.
    In Memory of Paul "Dietrich" Stines.
    Dad: Say something nice to your cousin Shirley
    Dietrich: For a fat girl you sure don't sweat much.
    Cue sound of Head slap.

    RIP Muggsy & TMan

    "If you are a warrior legally authorized to carry a weapon and you step outside without that weapon, then you become a sheep, pretending that JOCKO will not come today."

  2. #12
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    Start simple. I shoot thousands of rounds per year and because I am mostly retired, running a 50 year old single stage press while listening to Limbaugh in the background is a total joy.
    I sold a progressive press because it was too efficient.
    "Never pet a burning dog"

  3. #13
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    There is definitely a satisfaction in taking each round through the process. Kind of custom tailoring one round at a time. I like to clean primer pockets, debur the case mouth which usually doesn't take much. I like being able to look at a tray of 50 with powder charged and check each one to make sure none are empty. That happened though, missed one whole row of 5. Couldn't believe I was so negligent, but stuff happens. Nobody died and no guns were damaged so kind of like a little white lie and momma says a little white lie never hurt nobody.

    I'll keep my Lock N Load Hornady. I haven't had to reload for several years but soon it will be time to knock the dust off and get back at it. Time is more on my side these days.
    In Memory of Paul "Dietrich" Stines.
    Dad: Say something nice to your cousin Shirley
    Dietrich: For a fat girl you sure don't sweat much.
    Cue sound of Head slap.

    RIP Muggsy & TMan

    "If you are a warrior legally authorized to carry a weapon and you step outside without that weapon, then you become a sheep, pretending that JOCKO will not come today."

  4. #14
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    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bawanna View Post
    The best way to get into this reloading thing is to find somebody who reloads that you trust and watch or help reload a few. This helps you decide if you want a single stage or progressive press and gives you a solid idea of the equipment that is a must have or the equipment that is nice and you can get later.

    Just like most everything else there are tons of options out there and unlike most other things most of the options are very good.
    (emphasis mine)

    This is worth repeating, with emphasis. I know there's a lot of instructional videos available out there on the 'net. Unfortunately...some of them are worth about what you paid for them...or WORSE...downright dangerous and a beginner probably won't know the difference.
    For myself...my Father started me out when I was about 8 yrs old, helping him cast bullets and load 38 wadcutter rounds. Eisenhower was President and life was good. I've continued casting and loading ever since. I've always considered it to be part of the enjoyment I derive from the shooting sports, not "extra work" like some folks do.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by guido4198 View Post
    ........... I've always considered it to be part of the enjoyment I derive from the shooting sports, not "extra work" like some folks do.

    words to live by


    jd
    ________________________________________
    ---------------------------------------------------

    It's not gun control that we need, it's soul control!

  6. #16
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    Feb 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by guido4198 View Post
    (emphasis mine)

    This is worth repeating, with emphasis. I know there's a lot of instructional videos available out there on the 'net. Unfortunately...some of them are worth about what you paid for them...or WORSE...downright dangerous and a beginner probably won't know the difference.
    For myself...my Father started me out when I was about 8 yrs old, helping him cast bullets and load 38 wadcutter rounds. Eisenhower was President and life was good. I've continued casting and loading ever since. I've always considered it to be part of the enjoyment I derive from the shooting sports, not "extra work" like some folks do.
    After a lifetime of doing this I'd wager you've saved a boatload of money in the process.
    Thanks for the good advice about trusting your safety to free instruction on something that can go badly very quickly. I like youtube and use it a lot for instructional videos, but when working with something that is inherently dangerous it's better to learn from someone who is there to point out your mistakes as you learn.

  7. #17
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    Dec 2010
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    Regarding training -- What got me started in reloading was taking a NRA Reloading class that was taught by a friend at the friendly LGS. Very good curriculum and instruction, emphasizing safety throughout the process. I would highly recommend finding and taking one of the NRA classes.

  8. #18
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    I got my start visiting a Department store, Payless I think it was. They had a Factory Rep from RCBS there to show their products. It wasn't really a formal class, just chat at the counter but the guy was good.
    Expecting a bunch of people to show up and possibly run out of products, I went the night before and bought all the stuff I thought I'd need.
    Got a Single Stage Rock Chucker (which now lives with Old Lincoln) after I was left a second one from a deceased friend. They had a starter kit with the scales, and measures, all the little stuff.
    Then I went and chatted with the guy from RCBS. He confirmed form me that I got all the good stuff and suggested a few not required but nice things to get when I could, some not even his brand. He helped immensely with my concerns, a couple other guys were trying to feed me info and his words of wisdom were carefully dissect information and make sure it was safe.
    In Memory of Paul "Dietrich" Stines.
    Dad: Say something nice to your cousin Shirley
    Dietrich: For a fat girl you sure don't sweat much.
    Cue sound of Head slap.

    RIP Muggsy & TMan

    "If you are a warrior legally authorized to carry a weapon and you step outside without that weapon, then you become a sheep, pretending that JOCKO will not come today."

  9. #19
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    Oct 2009
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    Much good advice here.....I was lucky in that an old timer salesman at a LGS was very helpful when I decided to try my hand at reloading, he highly recommended a basic single stage press to start with so for about 3 hundred bucks or so I bought a Redding press kit which came with a powder measure and balance beam scales and I still use the same equipment to this day....I also bought a simple digital scale which I highly recommend...I load for .38/.357 .44 and .45acp so I decided to stick with one powder that would work with all so I went with Universal Clays and it works fine, measures well and is easy to work with without having multiple powders which I might mess up with, I was just getting started so I went with the KISS keep it simple stupid method and it worked out fine and I found out that reloading was almost as much fun as shooting......Unless you shoot lots of ammo you probably won't save a ton of money reloading but it is a nice way to spend an evening making a few rounds....

    I recommend that you buy a single stage press of any brand as they are all well made and will last a life time and spend the extra money to get Carbide Dies which are well worth it and are so much easier to work with...Buy at least 2 reloading manuals from different manufacturers and ALWAYS follow the powder weight in the book for whatever load you are working with, start at the minimum powder throw and not the maximum, you can always work up a little at a time to get what suits you but NEVER over load what's in the book....Bad JuJu happens when you do....

    I would start out loading 50 rounds at a time and do each step for all 50 one step at a time... Deprime 50 cases, Size 50, Bell 50 case mouths then Prime 50 ( Buy an inexpensive Lee hand repriming tool so you can feel the primer going in ) well worth the money! and wear latex gloves when touching primers....Charge 50 with powder after weighing at least 10 sample charges on both manual beam and digital scales to be triple sure you have the correct powder weight then put them in a case holder and take a very close look at the powder level under a good light just to be sure you didn't double change a case then press in bullets and roll crimp revolver cartridges and neck crimp semi auto....One last inexpensive tool you will need is a bullet puller which looks like a plastic hammer used to remove seated bullets and a tool you will need because you will mess up a few at first but everybody does....

    Sounds like a lot to know and intimidating but after a short learning curve you will wonder why this stuff seemed so hard to understand at first and you will begin to enjoy a new and fun hobby, save lots of money? Probably not but once you get started you will be hooked....Good luck and if you have questions, well you know where to come for help.....
    My wife says that I never listen to her or something like that

  10. #20
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    The Lee Hand Primer tool was one thing the RCBS guy recommended and it's the best thing since donut holes.
    In Memory of Paul "Dietrich" Stines.
    Dad: Say something nice to your cousin Shirley
    Dietrich: For a fat girl you sure don't sweat much.
    Cue sound of Head slap.

    RIP Muggsy & TMan

    "If you are a warrior legally authorized to carry a weapon and you step outside without that weapon, then you become a sheep, pretending that JOCKO will not come today."

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